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Frances Mary Weech[1, 2, 3, 4]
Female 1838 - 1916

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  • Birth  9 Oct 1838  Upton Noble, Somersetshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender  Female 
    AFN  1GLW-48 
    Died  19 Apr 1916  Wellington, Carbon, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried  Provo, Utah, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID  I11  Maxcey Ewell Family
    Last Modified  10 Jul 2013 
     
    Father  Samuel Weech,   b. 2 Feb 1811, Somerton, Somerset, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Oct 1852, Alta, Madison, Illinois, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Mother  Elizabeth Gould,   b. 8 Feb 1810, Bruton, Somerset, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Feb 1894, Pima, Graham, Arizona, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  4 Nov 1832  Somerton, Somerset, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID  F300  Group Sheet
     
    Family  Francis Marion Ewell,   b. 3 Nov 1835, , Ray, Missouri, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Jan 1904, Spring Glen, Carbon, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  27 Jul 1858  Salt Lake City, Salt Lake, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Notes 
    • Marr: EH Sealings to Couples, film 183,395
    Children 
    >1. Sarah Eliza Ewell,   b. 8 Jun 1860, Goshen, Utah, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 Mar 1926, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, USA Find all individuals with events at this location
    >2. Franklin Marion Ewell,   b. 6 Feb 1862, Payson, Utah, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Dec 1923, Provo, Utah, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location
    >3. Lorenzo Hyrum Ewell,   b. 25 Feb 1865, Goshen, Utah, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 Mar 1927, Midway, Wasatch, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location
    >4. Mary Elizabeth Ewell,   b. 25 Feb 1868, Cottonwood, Salt Lake, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Feb 1913, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, USA Find all individuals with events at this location
    >5. William Walter Ewell,   b. 12 Jan 1870, Goshen, Utah, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 Oct 1950, Salt Lake City, S-Lk, Ut, USA Find all individuals with events at this location
    >6. Laura Ann Ewell,   b. 20 Aug 1872, Santaquin, Utah, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Sep 1966, , , , California Find all individuals with events at this location
     7. Ewell,   b. Abt 1874, , Santaquin, Utah, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1874
     8. Either Ewell,   b. 27 May 1877, Santaquin, Utah, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. INFANT
    >9. Purmitt Samuel Ewell,   b. 20 Aug 1879, Santaquin, Utah, Utah, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 30 Jul 1927, , Midvale, Salt Lake, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location
    Family ID  F2  Group Sheet
     
  • Photos
    Weech, Frances Mary
    Weech, Frances Mary
     
    Histories Ewell, Francis Marion and Frances Mary Weech history
    Ewell, Francis Marion and Frances Mary Weech history
     
  • Notes 
    • Birth: Registration of birth in Dist. of Shepton Mallet, Sub Dist of Evercreech, application no. P.A.S. 039639/75/F, zeroxed copy.

      Death: Provo City Cem. Sexton Rec. 979.224 pl V3h

      Bert Ewell 3353 Benton St. Santa Clara, CA 95051, sent the following account:
      "Francis Mary Weech Ewell was living with her youngest son, Permitt Samuel Ewell when she died. My Mother Lela Virginia Ewell relates that she was Ill when she arrived in Wellington. She came by train. the house was not far from the train staion, fortunately. Her son Purmitt and friends carried her from the train to the house where my Grandmother, Ethel Jane Savage Ewell had a room and bed ready for her."

      Bap: TIB card of Arizona Temple records; a family group sheet records 1848 without a month and day
      End: EH Endow. Bk E pg 178, film 183,405
      SP: TIB card and IGI

      History:
      A delightful history was written by Iving Bigelow, a grandson, found at the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers Museum. He decribes her looks, personality and what it was like to go to Grandmothers house.
      "She was a small woman, perhaps 5ft. 4 inches tall; and I guess she weughed 120 pounds. She had blonde hair, and light blue eyes.
      She kept the house neat and clean, doing things on time and not leaving them to be done later. I never saw her angry or frown, she was always pleasant and spoke with a soft voice and never complained. She did not speak with an English accent. She often spoke to grandfather in endearing terms. She often cooked a big meal on Sundays for children and grandchildren. Two of their sons lived in Spring Glen with their families . They were Uncle Frank and Uncle Ren. They are the ones who camt to meals, and to the eveings of fun with games , recitations, group singing and other activities. Other guests were also invited for these occasions. Grandfather and my Uncle Will had very fine voices. Uncle Purmitt was living at home at this time.
      Grandmother would cook mush, bacon and eggs, pork and veal, all kinds of vegetables from the garden, including sweet corn, rhubarb, potatoes with brown or milk gravy, fried chicken , chicken stew and dumplings, yeast bread and biscuits, corn bread and other things to numerous to mention One day I caught some big bull frogs and brought them home for Grandmother to cook, which she did, but she would not eat them with me.
      Grandma was also very brave. One day she found a skunk in their shanty kitchen, which was on the north side of the house; but rather than let it escape, she killed it with a a hoe or broom handle. Another day she fought off a big chicken hawk wihich came swooping down in the front yard to pick up some little chickens."

      Another account was found in the Ewell Genealogy Binder, compiled by Jenny Weeks and Erma Ewell
      "Fannie often baked pies and bread to sell to the Indians. She often had many encounters with them and showed much grit and courage in doing so. One day [in Payson, Utah] when she was by herrself, an indian came and wanted bread for nothing, she gave him the bread, then he wanted some butter. Since it was so hard to get, she refused and he started after her. She picked up the chair and threw it at him, and then he left."
      P.S. by William M. Ewell

      One history was written by her daughter, Laura A. Dennis, found at the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers Museum in Salt Lake City.
      1845, She crossed the Atlantic ocean when she was six years old, they were eight weeks on the water (Note: According to a letter written by Elizabeth Gould Weech in 1881, the family crossed the Atlantic in 1848). "When a girl, she learned to make mens clothes. She was an expert taylor and made all my brother's suits. As a girl she attended all the church organiztions, and grew to be a very religiours young woman."
      1858, 27 July, married Francis Marion Ewell in Salt Lake City. " Then they went first to Goshen."
      1860, Moved to Payson
      1865, 24 Nov, endowed in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City.
      1877, Francis Marion, " built a mill on Summit Creek near Santaquin. When they moved to Santaquin, she became Primary President for about three years.
      1882, went to the area now known as Spring Glen. "When they went to Spring Glen, she was busy raising her family and keeping her big house in order, as so many of the family and friends loved to go to the Ewells. There was always an air of hopitality and friendly good-will in their home. Mother was an expert housekeeper and a good cook. She kept boarders at the time the railroad came through and also when the narrow gorge was replaced with the wide gorge through to Denver."
      "Father built a two story house. The upstairs were the bedrooms and the entire downstaairs was one huge room. This floor was large enough for dances and socials. People would come from all the surrounding farms and small communities to have real old fashioned good times. The apostles and leaders of the Church always came to our place to stay while on their visits out to Castle Valley as it was called."
      1904, "After father died she moved to Provo, buying her a little home there. She had a stroke.

      In a rather detailed history by her brother Hyrum Weech, he tells of the family's journey from England to the West.

      1848, The Samuel Weech family emigrated from England to America in the sailing vessel by the name of Sailor Prince, landing in New Orleans. Staying there a short time due to the sickness of their youngest child, Emma.
      1849, By 16 May, Emma died in Alton, Illinois. From New Orleans,they took a steamboat to Alton, Illinois. They built a home on leased ground, made a comfortable living, but were not able to save much to go to the Valley of the Great Salt Lake. A number of LDS families had settled there to prepare for the journey across the plains. 1850, 15 July, Emily was born in Alton, Illinois
      1852, 20 Oct, Samuel, died from dysentary..
      1856, June, They took passage with a steamboat with other saints from St. Louis, on the Missouri River to Florence Nebraska, arriving in the middle of June.
      1856, 4 July, they left by ox team with Captain John Banks.
      1856, 3 Oct, They arrived in Salt Lake City, then traveled four miles south to Mill Creek to a Mr. Chaples' Farm. He furnished them with a one room log cabin with a dirt floor. " Fanny had gone out to work in the city."
      1858, 27 July, Fanny married Francis Marion Ewell

      8 May 1904, Recieved into the Spring Glen Branch from Provo,
      HDC Film WRF page 14

      History:
      A delightful history was written by Iving Bigelow, a grandson, found at the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers Museum. He decribes her looks, personality and what it was like to go to Grandmothers house.
      "She was a small woman, perhaps 5ft. 4 inches tall; and I guess she weughed 120 pounds. She had blonde hair, and light blue eyes.
      She kept the house neat and clean, doing things on time and not leaving them to be done later. I never saw her angry or frown, she was always pleasant and spoke with a soft voice and never complained. She did not speak with an English accent. She often spoke to grandfather in endearing terms. She often cooked a big meal on Sundays for children and grandchildren. Two of their sons lived in Spring Glen with their families . They were Uncle Frank and Uncle Ren. They are the ones who camt to meals, and to the eveings of fun with games , recitations, group singing and other activities. Other guests were also invited for these occasions. Grandfather and my Uncle Will had very fine voices. Uncle Purmitt was living at home at this time.
      Grandmother would cook mush, bacon and eggs, pork and veal, all kinds of vegetables from the garden, including sweet corn, rhubarb, potatoes with brown or milk gravy, fried chicken , chicken stew and dumplings, yeast bread and biscuits, corn bread and other things to numerous to mention One day I caught some big bull frogs and brought them home for Grandmother to cook, which she did, but she would not eat them with me.
      Grandma was also very brave. One day she found a skunk in their shanty kitchen, which was on the north side of the house; but rather than let it escape, she killed it with a a hoe or broom handle. Another day she fought off a big chicken hawk wihich came swooping down in the front yard to pick up some little chickens."

      One history was written by her daughter, Laura A. Dennis, found at the Daughters of the Utah Pioneers Museum in Salt Lake City.
      1845, She crossed the Atlantic ocean when she was six years old, they were eight weeks on the water (Note: According to a letter written by Elizabeth Gould Weech in 1881, the family crossed the Atlantic in 1848). "When a girl, she learned to make mens clothes. She was an expert taylor and made all my brother's suits. As a girl she attended all the church organiztions, and grew to be a very religiours young woman."
      1858, 27 July, married Francis Marion Ewell in Salt Lake City. " Then they went first to Goshen."
      1860, Moved to Payson
      1865, 24 Nov, endowed in the Endowment House in Salt Lake City.
      1877, Francis Marion, " built a mill on Summit Creek near Santaquin. When they moved to Santaquin, she became Primary President for about three years.
      1882, went to the area now known as Spring Glen. "When they went to Spring Glen, she was busy raising her family and keeping her big house in order, as so many of the family and friends loved to go to the Ewells. There was always an air of hopitality and friendly good-will in their home. Mother was an expert housekeeper and a good cook. She kept boarders at the time the railroad came through and also when the narrow gorge was replaced with the wide gorge through to Denver."
      "Father built a two story house. The upstairs were the bedrooms and the entire downstaairs was one huge room. This floor was large enough for dances and socials. People would come from all the surrounding farms and small communities to have real old fashioned good times. The apostles and leaders of the Church always came to our place to stay while on their visits out to Castle Valley as it was called."
      1904, "After father died she moved to Provo, buying her a little home there. She had a stroke.

      1848, The Samuel Weech family emigrated from England to America in the sailing vessel by the name of Sailor Prince, landing in New Orleans. Staying there a short time due to the sickness of their youngest child, Emma.
      1849, By 16 May, Emma died in Alton, Illinois. From New Orleans,they took a steamboat to Alton, Illinois. They built a home on leased ground, made a comfortable living, but were not able to save much to go to the Valley of the Great Salt Lake. A number of LDS families had settled there to prepare for the journey across the plains. 1850, 15 July, Emily was born in Alton, Illinois
      1852, 20 Oct, Samuel, died from dysentary..
      1856, June, They took passage with a steamboat with other saints from St. Louis, on the Missouri River to Florence Nebraska, arriving in the middle of June.
      1856, 4 July, they left by ox team with Captain John Banks.
      1856, 3 Oct, They arrived in Salt Lake City, then traveled four miles south to Mill Creek to a Mr. Chaples' Farm. He furnished them with a one room log cabin with a dirt floor. " Fanny had gone out to work in the city."
      1858, 27 July, Fanny married Francis Marion Ewell

      Fanny Ewell
      Age: 61
      Birth Date: Oct 1838
      Birthplace: England
      Home in 1900: Helper, Carbon, Utah
      [Carbon]
      Race: White
      Gender: Female
      Immigration Year: 1864
      Relation to Head of House: Wife
      Marital Status: Married
      Spouse's Name: Francis M Ewell
      Marriage Year: 1858
      Years Married: 42
      Father's Birthplace: England
      Mother's Birthplace: England
      Mother: number of living children: 7
      Mother: How many children: 9
      Occupation: View on Image
      Neighbors: View others on page
      Household Members: Name Age
      Francis M Ewell 64
      Fanny Ewell 61
      Perucit Ewell 20
     
  • Sources 
    1. [S105] Personal Files & Documents, Paul A. Jensen.

    2. [S106] #26.

    3. [S107] Ancestral File (R), The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, (Copyright (c) 1987, June 1998, data as of 5 January 1998).

    4. [S108] IGI search: "WADDILOW", LDS FAMILY SEARCH, (Batch: F823364, Sheet: 033, Source Call No.: 1395545, Type: Film).

  

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